SADIKA BIO
After having studied at the Tunis School of fine arts, SADIKA received an advanced glass maker craft training in MURANO, near Venice. Back in Tunisia, she built her own oven and started producing her first art objects, thus bringing in again the blown glass craft which had been left since the 14th Century.

In parallel to her theoretical and practical researches on the Punic glass manufacturing, SADIKA has brought a new design to the traditional handicraft by creating art objects where glass combines with iron, silver, copper, wood, etc… In fact, it is from the deep bottom of her practical experience that she quickly felt the constraints imposed upon her by the very nature of these art objects. Whatever is their beauty and whatever is their technical prowess, their form is but a true confinement and domestication of the matter? The object, in itself, does it not reach its limits when simply being confined or contemplated in a show window?

From that time, the whole work done by SADIKA, has consisted in exploring the ways emphasizing the glass specific properties. First, she has managed to come across a first stage by dating back to the sources through the making of glass-paste, a precious material, used for instance, by the Egyptians to sparkle the eyes of their divinities statutes. Thus, she made sculptures starting from themes either fictive (Petit Catalogue des Nations Barbares) or mythological (Les Voiliers du temps) where the matter plays with iron; or integrated to larger panels, the same matter combines with aluminium. Nevertheless, this technic, though it does stress the material grain and particular texture, does not appear, to her mind, really different from the traditional sculpting.

So, SADIKA has tried to better magnify the glass by confronting it to natural elements. That is what does appear in her cubic construction, with blown glass, notably her sculpture “Fountain” titled (Le Partage des Eaux) (Watershed). Yet, composed of distinct elements, the cubic constructions have a true tendency to melt the elements within a unity of perfection and having a far better look thanks to the concrete wild opacity, that the matter in its whole nobleness, is made sublime only by the plays of light and transparency. Trough these installations with geometrical lines and in the simplicity of the forms animated from the inside, the imperceptible water movement and, at the outside, the colours and the forms of the vegetations are perceived as if they were in filigree. SADIKA, we can safely say, is looking for the impossible equation which will enable her, on one hand, to enhance the pure matter in a better way and, on the other hand, to paradoxically live it down in a way that only the latent spirituality can be seized.. First, she has managed to come across a first stage by dating back to the sources through the making of glass-paste, a precious material, used for instance, by the Egyptians to sparkle the eyes of their divinities statutes. Thus, she made sculptures starting from themes either fictive (Petit Catalogue des Nations Barbares) or mythological (Les Voiliers du temps) where the matter plays with iron; or integrated to larger panels, the same matter combines with aluminium. Nevertheless, this technic, though it does stress the material grain and particular texture, does not appear, to her mind, really different from the traditional sculpting.

So, SADIKA has tried to better magnify the glass by confronting it to natural elements. That is what does appear in her cubic construction, with blown glass, notably her sculpture “Fountain” titled (Le Partage des Eaux) (Watershed). Yet, composed of distinct elements, the cubic constructions have a true tendency to melt the elements within a unity of perfection and having a far better look thanks to the concrete wild opacity, that the matter in its whole nobleness, is made sublime only by the plays of light and transparency. Trough these installations with geometrical lines and in the simplicity of the forms animated from the inside, the imperceptible water movement and, at the outside, the colours and the forms of the vegetations are perceived as if they were in filigree. SADIKA, we can safely say, is looking for the impossible equation which will enable her, on one hand, to enhance the pure matter in a better way and, on the other hand, to paradoxically live it down in a way that only the latent spirituality can be seized.